Even in the Barn

Fiberglass Awareness

A distant view of a red barn with scaffolding and workers removing fiberlass insluation. There is a white stone wall and a wooden split rail fence.

Even our barn has fiberglass insulation in it. Below the roof there is a fan that vents the fiberglass lined attic. When that fan was running the outdoor air would turn from good to poor as the fan sucked out formaldehyde fumes along with small particles and dispersed them into the air. Some days were worse than others depending on the humidity level and wind direction. On the hot, humid days with little breeze it would be the worst, as the particles would linger around the entire area. We are removing all of the fiberglass from the barn.

Scaffolding set up in front of the red barn with men taking the fiberglass batts out of the walls. The lower part of the barn is a white stone wall.

The inside of the barn became noticeably worse after there was a water leak along the back wall getting the batts wet, which caused them to break down and off gas at a faster rate.

An interior wall of a barn showing the electrical boxes with yellow fiberglass batts around them.

The fiberglass batts to be removed from around the electrical boxes.

A wall of a red barn that has a roof coming off of the lower area with pink and yellow batts of fiberglass exposed in the walls after the T1-11 was removed.

Two different brands of fiberglass on the wall of the barn, pink and yellow.

A wall of a red barn with T1-11 taken off showing the yellow batts of fiberglass underneath.

The yellow fiberglass batts behind the walls of the barn.

An outside wall of a red barn with the T1-11 removed showing pink batts of fiberglass. You can see the chicken coop off to the left in the distance.

The pink fiberglass batts

The wall of a barn with a construction worker removing the T1-11 to get the fiberglass batts out. There are yellow batts showing where it was already removed.

Fiberglass removal along the backside of the barn.

Yellow fiberglass batts falling out of a wall of a barn.

Yellow batts of fiberglass coming out of the walls.

Side angle view - pink fiberglass batts falling out of a wall of a barn from the second story room with ladders and scaffolding set up.

Pink batts of fiberglass coming out of the walls from the second story room.

Head on view - pink fiberglass batts falling out of a wall of a barn from the second story room with ladders and scaffolding set up.
A crow bar prying out yellow fiberglass insulation that is stuck to black paper from behind a beam in a studded wall.

The workers had thought they got it all out, but when I walked into the room I could smell and feel it coming from the wall. Sure enough, there was more fiberglass behind some of the beams.

Close up - A crow bar and a saw prying out yellow fiberglass insulation that is stuck to black paper from behind a beam in a studded wall.

The studded walls, although they will be covered with either dry wall or wood paneling, will have to be caulked and painted on the inside to seal in what little bits are left. The tiniest of particles cannot be seen and are very hard to get out from between the cracks in the wood.

A crow bar and a saw prying out yellow fiberglass insulation that is stuck to black paper from behind a beam in a studded wall.
A person with red fingernails holding a piece of a shingle that shows glass fibers in it.

The barn had roof shingles that had glass fibers in them. They too were causing health problems. We had them removed and replaced with red tin.

A white barn with a red tin roof.

The barn after the fiberglass removal was complete.

The Maguire Farm Barn

Sharon Maguire - Updated 12-27-2016

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