Fiberglass under the Roof

Fiberglass Awareness

A wooden log cabin with a wrap around deck. There is a dumpster in front of it, and a man on a ladder about to climb up on the roof with a second man at the top peak of the roof.

This newly built log cabin had very poor indoor air quality. I always felt sick after spending the night. The air inside felt thick and reminded me of a slight sting when inhaling. My muscles would ache and feel cramped up with an upset stomach. The longer we stayed the more symptoms would come on and the sicker I felt. A handful of people who stayed also felt something was not right, while others seemed to not notice. This beautiful log cabin that sits on top of a mountain was lacking the mountain fresh air. Even on the porch I could feel the poor air coming from the roof vents. When I discovered my sensitivity to fiberglass I knew it all had to be removed from the cabin.

A wooden log cabin with three men on the roof ripping off shingles and a man on the ground in front of a dumpster picking up plywood from a pile and a 5th man in an orange sweat shirt standing on the ground walking towards the cabin.

Luckily the walls were thick solid wooden logs which did not contain fiberglass. Fiberglass however was in the roof shingles along with thick batts under the roofs plywood and fiberglass flex ducts in the basement. It all had to go.

Three Amish men on the roof of a log cabin ripping up shingles with a fourth man in an orange sweat shirt standing on a ladder that is leaning against the side of the house.

The shingles were scraped off, the plywood was taken up and the thick fiberglass batts were removed.

Amish men on the roof of a log cabin pulling divout fiberglass batts from under the plywood. There is a dumpster in front of it that is full of fiberglass and wood and a pile of new wood next to the dumpster.

Pulling out the fiberglass batts from the log cabin roof.

Two Amish men sitting on the roof of a log cabin that has half of the shingles ripped off exposing the wood underneath.Four Amish men on the roof of a log cabin ripping off black roof shingles.Two Amish men on the roof of a log cabin standing inside of the wooden bays after the shingles and plywood had been removed from that half of the roof. There is a ladder leaning against the side of the building.

Picking out any remaining fiberglass by hand that stuck to the wood and on the ends of nails etc...

A very large pile of yellow fiberglass batts in the driveway in front of wooden log cabin steps. There is a pile of new plywood behind it.

A pile of 12 inch R-38 fiberglass that was removed from under the log cabin's roof.

Front side view of a wooden log cabin with shingles remaining on the lower end of the roof. They were removed from the top near the peak and there is a large pile of fiberglass on the ground in front of the cabin and a second pile on the side of the cabin.

The roof shingles being removed from the other side of the cabin with piles of fiberglass on the ground.

The side of a log cabin with the roof shingles taken off exposing the wood under. New plywood is being put down and there is a large pile of yellow fiberglass in front of the cabin on the ground. Three men are up on the roof.

Putting new plywood back after the batts were removed.

Three men up on the roof of a wooden log cabin putting down new plywood. There is a fourth man standing on the ground next to a very large 8 foot pile of yellow fiberglass batts.The front side view of a wooden log cabin with four men up on the roof after the shingles and plywood had been removed. There is a very large pile of fiberglass on the side of the cabin with a second pile in front of the cabin.

Checking over the roof and making sure no pieces of fiberglass are left behind before the plywood goes back on.

A large pile of thick yellow fiberglass batts laying on the ground in front of a pile of black roof shingles in front of a split rail fence.

A large pile of fiberglass and a pile of fiberglass based roof shingles. This yard is going to have to be thoroughly cleaned up.

A large pile of yellow fiberglass batts laying in the stone gravel driveway with a wheel barrow sitting in front of it.

Piles of fiberglass that were removed from under the roof.

Three Amish men in straw hats on top of a log cabin roof that has had its shingles and plywood removed. The men are putting new plywood back.

Putting the plywood back after the bays have been cleaned.

Three men on top of a log cabin roof nailing up new plywood. There is a large dumpster full of yellow fiberglass batts in front of them.The side view of a log cabin roof with two men on the roof and one man on a ladder that is leaning against the side. There is a strip of green tin on the far right side of the roof. The rest is plywood.

We decided to go with a green tin roof. We had to make sure no material containing fiberglass was put back on under the tin.

A wooden log cabin with half of the roof green tin and the other half plywood. There are four men on the roof laying down the green tin and a pile of yellow fiberglass on the left of the image on the ground. The cabin has a split rail fence around the back yard.

The green tin going down.

The side of a log cabin with a green tin roof. There is a man on the top of the peak of the roof and a pile of yellow fiberglass on the ground.Front side view of a wooden log cabin with a green tin roof. There is a dumpster full of yellow fiberglass batts in front of it.

Eagerly waiting for an empty dumpster to show up so those fiberglass batts and fiberglass based shingles can be taken away.

Back side view of a wooden log cabin with a green tin roof. There are two men on the roof. One is begining to come down the ladder and the other is up at the peak. Another man in a straw hat is standing on the ground looking up at the men on the roof. There are piles of wood and fiberglass in the yard and a fourth Amish man in a straw hat standing off to the right of the image.

This will most likely be the last time this cabin will need a new roof in my lifetime. Tin lasts much longer than shingles and is a much cleaner material. Finally, a real mountain fresh cabin with true clean air.

Sharon Maguire - Updated 5-10-2017

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