Fires

Fiberglass Awareness

A three story tan and red home with a house burning behind it.

When people think about the dangers of a house or building fire they often refer to the smoke inalation and toxic fumes as the structure is activly burning. Rarely does the burning fiberglass, amount of pollution it puts out, health hazards to all living creatures around it and the long lasting effects after the fact cross their minds.

A row of townhomes with the middle three burnt down by a fire.

These townhomes not only had fiberglass batts in their walls, but blown in lose fiberglass in the attics. Glass does not burn, so where did it all go? Airborne, raining down on everyone's heads and settling on the ground. The damaged areas will often sit for months before clean-up starts, meanwhile the fiberglass that is left in the damaged walls and laying in the rubble will be rained on, shatter and float around for everyone to breathe in.

The backside of a tan townhome that burned down in a fire.

The backside of a townhome that burned in a house fire. Boards where put up to block people from getting hurt in the rubble, but no thought is put into the poor air quality all of the surrounding neighbors and passersby will have to endure for months to come.

A house activly burning down with flames coming out of the roof.

A house activly burning. There is a good chance those roof shingles also contain glass fibers.

View from above of a house with smoke coming out of the roof and a red fire truck parked in the driveway.
A burning house with the roof gone and smoke coming out of it.
A burning house with a ladder leaning on the side of it, the roof gone and smoke coming from it.
A brick house with the roof gone and smoke coming from it.
A house with the roof burned off view from the front of the double car garage.

This home burned down months prior to this photograph. You can still smell the stench of fiberglass coming from it.

A house with the roof burned off view from the front door showing one garage door off to the left. The windows are boarded up.

When fiberglass gets wet and or damaged the amount of particles that float around are greatly accelerated. This mess will be rained on many more times before its cleaned up. Until then the wind will share the microscopic glass with the neighboring homes and all the cars that drive by every day.

A house that burned down and the second floor gone.
A brick house that burned down with the roof burned off.
Looking up into the ceiling of a house that burned down. The walls are brick and the beams are chared.
A street in a town of row homes with smoke coming from the end house. There are fire fighters with a ladder against the house.

A fire in town burning in someone's attic.

A street in a town of row homes with smoke coming from the end house. There are fire fighters with a ladder against the house spraying water on it and a crowd of people watching from the street.

These people were not just breathing in a little smoke as they stood there watching, but microscopic glass particles.

The second floor of a house with flames coming from the roof and a couple of firemen on the roof. There is smoke coming from the house.
The view down a street with smoke coming from one of the homes, fire trucks and firemen in street and ladders leaning on the houses in various places.
The second floor of a brick and white house with fire fighters on the roof. There is smoke coming from the house.
Flames coming out of the roof of a house.
A brick house with smoke coming from it and fire fighters walking on the roof.

Sharon Maguire - Updated 11-17-2016

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